At-Home Therapeutic Activities

Toe Walking

July 8, 2020

A lot of kids will toe walk if they crave sensory stimulation (they like the bouncing on their toes), have Cerebral Palsy, Muscular Dystrophy, autism or if they just have tight calves. The two most common impairments that I treat with this are working with tight calves and making their foot muscles stronger. This helps them to walk with more stability (they aren’t falling over as much), able to clear their feet from the ground or stairs (again, not falling as much) and reduces the pain associated with having tight calves and feet.

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Improving Core Strength: Activities Using Household Items

July 8, 2020

This video provides six activities for children using a laundry basket, and a few other common household items. Each activity provides a variety of developmental benefits. The main skills these activities target are core strength, upper-extremity strength, proximal stability (strong base), dynamic balance, motor planning, and hand-eye coordination. These activities are great to incorporate into therapy sessions, and/or for kiddos to play with siblings/caregivers. They are designed for children with varying abilities, and are easily modified to fit each child's need.

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Games to Improve Gross Motor Skills While Stuck at Home

July 8, 2020

Erin, one of our amazing Physical Therapists, shows you three games she uses a lot during her tele-therapy sessions and parents can too: a) Gross motor bingo is a game where the child yells out a number and we do the corresponding number’s gross motor suggestions (i.e. wall sitting) to help keep the child engaged as well as working on strength and motor milestone acquisition, b) Animal yoga: this works on a child’s proprioception (ability to figure out where their bodies are in space) as well as proximal joint stability (makes muscle stronger, which is especially important for kids that are “loosy goosy” or hypotonic). The child yells out an animal name and we scroll to that corresponding animal and hold the pose that is recommended for that animal. c) The wheel decides: this is a game that can be applied to tons of different activities. In this example, I used animal walks as the wheel category. Basically, we tap the screen and the wheel spins and lands on what animal is recommended, and we have to walk around like this animal. This is good for proximal joint stability, gait patterns, motor planning, etc.

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Sensory Bins: How to make your own at home

July 8, 2020

Using arms and legs on both sides of the body is a developmental skill required for many mobility skills, occupational skills, and activities of daily living. Being able to coordinate different parts of the body improves success in numerous life skills such as safe and efficient mobility skills, playing games and sports, and performance in job skills and automobile driving. This video instructs in how develop the ability to perform jumping jacks, which is a bilateral coordination activity that can lay the foundation toward more complex and meaningful life skills.

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Bilateral Coordination: Jumping Jacks

July 8, 2020

Using arms and legs on both sides of the body is a developmental skill required for many mobility skills, occupational skills, and activities of daily living. Being able to coordinate different parts of the body improves success in numerous life skills such as safe and efficient mobility skills, playing games and sports, and performance in job skills and automobile driving. This video instructs in how develop the ability to perform jumping jacks, which is a bilateral coordination activity that can lay the foundation toward more complex and meaningful life skills.

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Bilateral Coordination: Catching Skills

July 8, 2020

Catching is a developmental skill that requires bilateral coordination and eye-hand coordination. By mastering this skill, a child is able to participate in age appropriate gross motor activities and participate in community based physical activities. This video highlights ways to teach a child to catch a ball, building the skill up by increasing the complexity of the activity toward acquisition.

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Hitch Crawling

July 8, 2020

Hitch crawling is the type of crawling that babies will sometimes do where the baby does not crawl with their knees under their hips and they instead will “hitch” one leg out of the side and crawl that way. Babies will do this because their core muscles are a bit weaker than what we want, so this is how they are able to compensate for it while still being mobile. It’s important to address this so that their core muscles do get stronger and allow for proper growth and acquisition of milestones as well as allowing muscles to develop in their hips that get stronger through reciprocal crawling.

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Advanced Coordination Skills

July 8, 2020

Using arms and legs on both sides of the body is a developmental skill required for many mobility skills, occupational skills, and activities of daily living. Being able to coordinate different parts of the body improves success in numerous life skills such as safe and efficient mobility skills, playing games and sports, and performance in job skills and automobile driving. This video instructs in how develop the ability to perform various higher level bilateral coordination activities that can lay the foundation toward more complex and meaningful life skills.

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What is Occupational Therapy?

July 8, 2020

Sabena explains what Occupational Therapy is and the different areas of concern that Occupational Therapists can address such as: fine-motor skills, gross-motor skills, sensory integration, sensory diets, visual processing skills and more).

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